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View Full Version : Interested in Umpiring.....


sjbball34
11-03-2010, 04:13 PM
Good morning I am a new member to the ABUA but thought I would give it a look and get some tips on how to persue becoming an umpire. I am in the Milwaukee area and was considering getting my feet wet at the high school level so if there are any tips to getting started I am all years! I have playing experience and was a catcher if that helps. Like I said I'm all ears and look forward to corresponding with you all and receiving any knowledge possible.

Thanks SJBBALL34

jaxrolo
11-29-2010, 12:22 AM
First of all it is likely that a good association is not going to put you at a HS level to begin with. Most likely Middle School or JV.

Get rule books and case books and read them over and over again. Don't just read but imaging the situations in your mind. I have even used little figurine army men to setup situations.

johnnyg08
11-29-2010, 01:10 AM
Learn the rules. Being a former catcher will help you get started...but don't think you know everything just because you played. It's a completely different game from the umpire end of things. Get to a clinic or two as soon as you can. Your association will know that you're serious. Accept all feedback from your senior members. Ask for feedback and use your ears at the clinics and not your mouth unless you're asking questions. When you take your High School (FED) test, look up every question in the rule book. Don't assume you know it. Dig into the rule book and learn the mechanics of how to umpire. It can be fun...but you're new in a large metro area...so be prepared to start at the bottom and get better from there...you'll get noticed.

yawetag
11-29-2010, 05:02 AM
I have even used little figurine army men to setup situations.
I've never thought of that. I wonder if there would be a market for baseball players of the same size. Have two different teams (red and blue) with the following pieces:
Red Team: F1 in wind-up, F1 in set, F1 pitching; F2 standing, F2 crouching, F2 in a position similar to a play at the plate; F3 fielding, F3 on base catching ball; several other pieces of players fielding and catching balls, as well as lying on ground.
Blue Team: 3 players to count as R1, R2, R3; 1 player "diving" back to base; batter swinging, batter with bat on shoulders

Then, have a green felt (or plastic) baseball field and a baseball (possibly at the end of a dowel) to move around.

It would be a great training tool. :P

VTponyump
11-30-2010, 01:25 AM
Absolutely get a rule book...in fact, get two and (don't laugh) keep one in the bathroom. You'll be surprised how much quality reading time you can get in while dropping the deuce.

There are some good DVD/videos out there...Behind the Plate with John McSherry is a great one for learning plate work. There are some CD Roms that will allow you to select a sitch and then will animate the umpire's movements in response to the play. I have one that I actually found on EBay and it is very helpful.

And pick the brains of folks on this site. If you plan to do HS ball, the FED site (www.nfhs.org) also has a baseball officials forum.

heyblue26
11-30-2010, 11:35 AM
I would also say get a MLB Rule book first and read it over and over and study and study then once you understand it. Then work backwards for the level that you want to call, get that rule book and study it.

On this site there are some great materials that you can learn from and many great people here that can help. Diamond challenge is another great one, baseball rules in plain english is another. best of luck and study like its been said.

western_ump
11-30-2010, 06:01 PM
I've never thought of that. I wonder if there would be a market for baseball players of the same size. Have two different teams (red and blue) with the following pieces:

I have learned more at a bar using salt and pepper shakers, glasses, and napkins than on the field! Best way to learn when you can't be in a classroom with a white board to draw stuff out!

bobjenkins
12-01-2010, 01:48 PM
I would also say get a MLB Rule book first and read it over and over and study and study then once you understand it. Then work backwards for the level that you want to call, get that rule book and study it.

I would disagree.

I'd get the rule book for the level(s) I'd be working, and then add the others as needed. So, it might be FED and then OBR.

heyblue26
12-01-2010, 02:03 PM
I would disagree.

I'd get the rule book for the level(s) I'd be working, and then add the others as needed. So, it might be FED and then OBR.

bobjenkins: Maybe I should of made a statement like if you really want to know the rules of baseball you should start with the professional rules first. And after you understand the pro rules learning and remembering the differences at the various other levels would be much easier dont you think? but again we are all entitled to what is best for each and everyone of us to learn. IMO I think it is easier to learn the Pro rules and then go backward to the level Of baseball that you want to call that way you should have a better understanding of the rules of baseball. What do you think about that idea?

semper_fi_72
12-01-2010, 02:07 PM
I would disagree.

I'd get the rule book for the level(s) I'd be working, and then add the others as needed. So, it might be FED and then OBR.

I would disagree to disagree :cool:
Since all other rules are based and derived from OBR, I would start with OBR.

When I returned to umpiring after more than a decade off, I simply went out to a field, put my self in position and ran thru scenarios, moving as if I was covering that play.
It builds mental and muscle memory.

Try to find a mentor who is willing to help you.
I also had one assigned from my High School Association and they moved me up to Varsity after my first pre-season Varsity scrimmage game.

Get the best equipment you can afford to start.
The money you invest now will save you money later.

Be there for any Assignor you work for.
If they know they can count on you as being a good reliable umpire you will get games. Never turn back a game once you accept it, unless it is a emergency. When they call you for that last minute assignment do it anytime possible.

Make sure you thicken up your skin ;)

Welcome to the Forum and Umpiring

celebur
12-01-2010, 08:38 PM
Reading and re-reading the rules is important, but it's also important to understand that it is easy to misunderstand/misinterpret them. So ask questions of experienced umpires and be open to the fact that even if you think you know a rule, you might not really know it.

bobjenkins
12-02-2010, 02:49 PM
bobjenkins: Maybe I should of made a statement like if you really want to know the rules of baseball you should start with the professional rules first. And after you understand the pro rules learning and remembering the differences at the various other levels would be much easier dont you think? but again we are all entitled to what is best for each and everyone of us to learn. IMO I think it is easier to learn the Pro rules and then go backward to the level Of baseball that you want to call that way you should have a better understanding of the rules of baseball. What do you think about that idea?

The FED and NCAA books are complete on their own. IF that's the level the OP is going to be working, then he should, in my opinion, just start with those books.

In fact, when someone moves from an OBR-based set (say, Pony) to FED, I recommend that they do not just try to identify and remember the differences, but that they "forget" all they learned about the nuances of OBR, and start fresh with FED. Go through the rules book and the case book completely and be "surprised" by all they didn't know -- just as happened (or should have happened) the first time they read OBR and J/R and JEA.

heyblue26
12-02-2010, 05:35 PM
Go through the rules book and the case book completely and be "surprised" by all they didn't know -- just as happened (or should have happened) the first time they read OBR and J/R and JEA.[/QUOTE]

I could not agree more about being "surprised" as you have mentioned in reading OBR, J/R and JEA. I know I sure was. I still review and study each one of them over and over again.
Thanks.

Pete_Booth
12-03-2010, 02:41 PM
[QUOTE=semper_fi_72;116255]I would disagree to disagree :cool:
Since all other rules are based and derived from OBR, I would start with OBR.

If the poster is going to umpire at the HS level I would NOT start with the OBR rule-book because IMO it would cause confusion.

I agree with Bob. Learn each rule book seprately without co-mingling them.

There is NO FPSR in OBR
For the most part no sliding restrictions in OBR
Appeal process - Vastly different between FED/OBR
No MC rule in OBR
OBS - No Type A Type B in FED
so on and so forth

In a nusthell the rule codes are different and learning the OBR rule book first will not help you in umpiring FED games.

Therefore, it would behoove the poster to get the FED rule / case books FIRST then depending upon what "other" ball he will call then you learn OBR.

Pete Booth

johnnyg08
12-05-2010, 04:24 AM
An important issue if you choose to just read the FED book to get started is that when you start to do OBR ball, you must know the differences. I see it in my area all the time. Umpires work OBR games like FED games and it can be a problem.

heyblue26
12-05-2010, 07:30 PM
There is some very good topic disscusion here FED / NFHS rules are written and used for children of varying skills levels whom are of high school age or even younger and are based on their skill-level and age level. Baseball rules are derived from OBR.

They are also written so each individual is responsible to use good judgment and respect and to exercise good sportsmanship. Th rule book is written for a different level of play and has different exceptions compared to OBR rules as it has been stated. I believe it is also written for Safety reasons.

I myself still read the OBR first. Why because at least for me it is easier to understand the rules of the game and then read the rule book for the level of baseball that I would be calling.

The youth leagues most of there rule books are based on OBR except for the differnces that are found in their rule books. I do have the MLB, NFHS rule book as well as CCA, Pony, LL, Babe Ruth etc. What ever level of baseball that I call I use only those rules as found in the rules books. This is just IMIO and it works for me.

yawetag
12-06-2010, 03:11 AM
I myself still read the OBR first. Why because at least for me it is easier to understand the rules of the game and then read the rule book for the level of baseball that I would be calling.
You're also an experienced umpire, and one that has the experience in different levels of play. The OP is a new umpire, who just wants to know what needs to be known.

My suggestion, like others, is to read the book applicable to the league you're going to work.

heyblue26
12-06-2010, 08:38 AM
You're also an experienced umpire, and one that has the experience in different levels of play. The OP is a new umpire, who just wants to know what needs to be known.

My suggestion, like others, is to read the book applicable to the league you're going to work.

Thanks. Agree with you on what you have mentioned that he is a new umpire and should study the rules for which level he wants to start at. I am sure that he will do well Thanks.

Note: He may still have to refer to OBR for some clarification. I hope that he does well.