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gonz57
02-21-2010, 02:11 AM
How do you crease your umpire hat? By directly applying the iron or will it burn your hat? Also, at what temperature should the iron be set at? Hopefully some of you will include a picture or two.

Thanks

ump_24
02-21-2010, 03:32 AM
How do you crease your umpire hat? By directly applying the iron or will it burn your hat? Also, at what temperature should the iron be set at? Hopefully some of you will include a picture or two.

Thanks

Gonz,

First step is to fold your hat by hand where you want the crease. Personally, I fold it so the crease is slightly triangular right at the ventilation holes of the front of the hat

Once you've done that, head down to your ironing area. Wet a cloth so it is nice and damp and place it over top of the section of the hat you will be creasing.

As for the temperature, can't help you out too much there. The iron I use, courtesy of my mother, classifies temperature by what material you'll be ironing. Generally I just use max anyway however, because you still have the cloth to protect your hat. Working on a few pictures for you.

Richard_Siegel
02-21-2010, 05:09 AM
How do you crease your umpire hat? By directly applying the iron or will it burn your hat? Also, at what temperature should the iron be set at? Hopefully some of you will include a picture or two.

Thanks


I just crease it by hand. Don't use an iron. I just give it a little 5 seconds of crease work before each time I put it on.

seth503
02-21-2010, 09:53 PM
I just crease it by hand. Don't use an iron. I just give it a little 5 seconds of crease work before each time I put it on.

I do the same as Richard. Also, I don't work in an area where this is a huge deal, but do what your association expects, same as with many subjects.

finnerty
02-22-2010, 03:56 PM
I've been bald since college, so I have owned and worn literally hundreds of caps. I had never creased even one until I became an umpire. As an umpire, I always wear a cap that is creased. It started out as the preference of the instructors that trained me (when in Rome ...), but I have grown so accustomed to the look that I now prefer it. I truly think it adds to the overall sharpness of the umpire's whole uniform.

You can iron it or do it by hand. The iron method makes it more permanent.

robbyrudd455
02-22-2010, 05:43 PM
I'm not a fan of hat creasing, personally.

However, I've seen guys store their hats folded up with clothes pins holding the crease of the hat to the bill of the hat. That keeps the shape.

ump_24
02-23-2010, 04:30 AM
When I started I did not crease my hats (more correctly, at my age, I did not ask someone to crease my hats for me), partially because I had no idea umpire hats were even creased. Now that I trust myself to operate an iron, I do crease my hats.

However, at the present moment, only my hats that have logos on them are creased. I'm not sure I like the look of a creased, logo-less hat. That may change however.

zam989s
02-24-2010, 06:18 AM
I just started using the iron this year when I got some new hats, and it works well. I need to make sure I use the wet towel next time, because one of the hats did get a little burn mark on it....no biggie though.

I too use clothes pins to hold the crease while I'm storing the hats.

By the way, I had never tried to wash a hat, but I threw a couple of my Richardson wool hats in the washer with other laundry and let them air dry....they're as good as new.

heyblue26
02-24-2010, 09:28 AM
If I remember correctly reading an article by the MLB Umpire R. Drake website about this very thing. As I remember you first take the top front of the hat that you are going to crease and fold it down even with the prim of your hat so that it is even with the front edge, next take the back part of the hat and fold it so it is also even with the front half of the hat.

Now with a damp wet towel and a med hot iron and lay the towel over the hat and pressing it a few times to form the crease. Then you can use rubberbands to hold it in place over night until the next day. Remove the rubberbands and if you folded the front portion of the hat correctly you should have a nice and permant crease.

Just what I remember.

Richard_Siegel
02-24-2010, 12:45 PM
I just started using the iron this year when I got some new hats, and it works well. I need to make sure I use the wet towel next time, because one of the hats did get a little burn mark on it....no biggie though.

I too use clothes pins to hold the crease while I'm storing the hats.

By the way, I had never tried to wash a hat, but I threw a couple of my Richardson wool hats in the washer with other laundry and let them air dry....they're as good as new.

I tried washing my hats in the washer on the gentle cycle and even in the dishwaser. However, I found that the brims were never firm afterward. The cardboard in the brim apparently gets a bit too mushy from being saturated in the wash. I thought about it and decided that thing that you really need to get rid of on "dirty" hats in the the white salt (sweat stains) from perspiration that accumulates on the sides of the hat. The brim is rarely stained by the salt. Unless you drop your hat in the mud, the salt stain is the major concern to when cleaning the hat. I thought about it and realized that the salt is water soluble and should quickly dissolve if exposed to a lot of water. But how could you wash the hat without saturating the brim in a washer?

I started doing it a new way. Very primitive but it works. Once in a while when I start to notice the white salt stains begin to appear on a hat I will take the hat in the backyard and, holding it by the brim, I'll hose it off with a stiff spray from the garden hose for about 10 seconds. By holding the hat by the brim I can direct the water away from the brim so as little water as possible gets on the brim and it does not get very wet. Then I'll stuff the hat with a towel so it keeps its shape and I set the hat on a lawn chair out in the hot sun for the rest of the day. After it is dry it also comes out looking as good as new and the brim stays stiff.

BrianC14
02-24-2010, 03:29 PM
Salt stains are easy to get rid of if you spray down the hat after a game, then pat it dry with a clean towel.

It's the old "spray bottle and clean towel in the gear bag" routine.

seth503
02-24-2010, 10:14 PM
It's the old "spray bottle and clean towel in the gear bag" routine.
That's how I clean off my shoes. Very versatile, those spray bottles and towels. ;)

Brotherhood_of_Blue
02-25-2010, 04:54 AM
Salt stains are easy to get rid of if you spray down the hat after a game, then pat it dry with a clean towel.

It's the old "spray bottle and clean towel in the gear bag" routine.

Spray Bottle with a 50/50 mix of Water and Alcohol is a super cleaner, especially for the Salt Stains. Carried in the versatile spray bottle and pat dry with the towel. Use it on the interior of the hat also, especially around the "band" area where you tend to get buildup of things like sunscreen.

gonz57
02-25-2010, 06:54 AM
A lot of good info. Thanks to all.
The spray bottle does work well for the salt stains. When my hat gets too dirty, I simple rinse it in the sink with cold water and let it hang dry. The hat usually looks good again.

JHLeatherwood
02-25-2010, 04:43 PM
How do you crease your umpire hat? By directly applying the iron or will it burn your hat? Also, at what temperature should the iron be set at? Hopefully some of you will include a picture or two.

Thanks

Pardon my ignorance, but I have NO IDEA what kind of crease you're talking about. Can somebody please post a picture?

robbyrudd455
02-26-2010, 04:48 AM
Pardon my ignorance, but I have NO IDEA what kind of crease you're talking about. Can somebody please post a picture?


Look at the hard creases at the top of their hats above the logo.

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3542/3455818080_53ded4bb95.jpg

thunderheads
03-01-2010, 03:15 PM
Is it "necessary" to crease a logo-less cap?

robbyrudd455
03-01-2010, 03:30 PM
Is it "necessary" to crease a logo-less cap?

Well, NFL guys crease their hats... so yes?

Richard_Siegel
03-01-2010, 03:31 PM
Is it "necessary" to crease a logo-less cap?

No it isn't.

Creasing the hat is one of the several extra things umpires who have been properly trained do to distinguish themselves from the guys who just buy a blue shirt and wear grey pants from Sears. Things like polishing their shoes, wearing a cleaned and pressed pair of pants, keeping the shirt tucked in, wearing black socks are all things that are not "necessary" to umpire well. But they are necessary to best look the part. Perception is everything. Coaches may not consciously notice that you hat is creased, but the way the crease effects your appearance is noticed and it helps.

Daniel_B
03-01-2010, 04:37 PM
If I remember correctly reading an article by the MLB Umpire R. Drake website about this very thing.
thats the original post:

You will need a hat, an iron, a towel, some water, and something pretty heavy.

1. Wet your hat.
2. Fold the bill of your hat of your hat back up and pull the top of your hat down towards the bill. This should put a slight crease on the front of your hat. This crease can be before or after the buttons on the hat as per your preference.
3. When this slight crease is visible take the hat, put a towel over it to prevent burning and iron the crease so it is more pronounced.
4. Now with the front part folded over the bill recently ironed, bring the back part of the hat up to reach the fold in the front. The crease should be just behind the buttons on the back side and the back rim should just cover the inside of the hat when all folded up.
5. Unfold the hat and iron the back crease as you did the front.
6. You may need to re-iron your creases to get them just right.
7. When you get your hat ironed and can fold it up over the bill with both parts of the hat creased then you need to place it under something heavy (I used a table leg but a mattress or stack of phone books works well also) for a day or two until it has dried out and the creases have taken.

You may need to occasionally re-iron the hat but it shouldn't be a big deal. Remember to be careful not to burn your hat. It may also take you a hat or two until you get it down perfectly but good luck.

semper_fi_72
03-01-2010, 05:26 PM
thats the original post:

You will need a hat, an iron, a towel, some water, and something pretty heavy.

1. Wet your hat.
2. Fold the bill of your hat of your hat back up and pull the top of your hat down towards the bill. This should put a slight crease on the front of your hat. This crease can be before or after the buttons on the hat as per your preference.
3. When this slight crease is visible take the hat, put a towel over it to prevent burning and iron the crease so it is more pronounced.
4. Now with the front part folded over the bill recently ironed, bring the back part of the hat up to reach the fold in the front. The crease should be just behind the buttons on the back side and the back rim should just cover the inside of the hat when all folded up.
5. Unfold the hat and iron the back crease as you did the front.
6. You may need to re-iron your creases to get them just right.
7. When you get your hat ironed and can fold it up over the bill with both parts of the hat creased then you need to place it under something heavy (I used a table leg but a mattress or stack of phone books works well also) for a day or two until it has dried out and the creases have taken.

You may need to occasionally re-iron the hat but it shouldn't be a big deal. Remember to be careful not to burn your hat. It may also take you a hat or two until you get it down perfectly but good luck.

That is a lot of work.
Take 5 seconds and crease it with your fingers.
Job done.

bobjenkins
03-01-2010, 08:11 PM
Is it "necessary" to crease a logo-less cap?

If the others in your association / area do it, then it's "necessary" if you want to fit in.

If the others in your area don't do it, then you (likely) shouldn't.

Personally, I think it looks stupid. :shrug:

thunderheads
03-01-2010, 10:19 PM
If the others in your association / area do it, then it's "necessary" if you want to fit in.

If the others in your area don't do it, then you (likely) shouldn't.

Personally, I think it looks stupid. :shrug:

Thanks Bob.....much appreciated...

Richard, point taken ...

Dragon29
03-02-2010, 12:04 AM
Once in a while when I start to notice the white salt stains begin to appear on a hat I will take the hat in the backyard and, holding it by the brim, I'll hose it off with a stiff spray from the garden hose for about 10 seconds. By holding the hat by the brim I can direct the water away from the brim so as little water as possible gets on the brim and it does not get very wet. Then I'll stuff the hat with a towel so it keeps its shape and I set the hat on a lawn chair out in the hot sun for the rest of the day. After it is dry it also comes out looking as good as new and the brim stays stiff.

Just to add a bit to this - The method I use for cleaning is similar, only I use a 2-1 mixture of water & Febreze in a spray bottle; not only does it get rid of the salt stains, but it keeps it from smelling of sweat. I actually use this same solution to clean (the inside of) my CP as well (& yes, I've used it on my shin guards, but water will do just as nicely there)

Not a paid spokesperson

robbyrudd455
03-02-2010, 11:27 PM
No it isn't.

Creasing the hat is one of the several extra things umpires who have been properly trained do to distinguish themselves from the guys who just buy a blue shirt and wear grey pants from Sears. Things like polishing their shoes, wearing a cleaned and pressed pair of pants, keeping the shirt tucked in, wearing black socks are all things that are not "necessary" to umpire well. But they are necessary to best look the part. Perception is everything. Coaches may not consciously notice that you hat is creased, but the way the crease effects your appearance is noticed and it helps.

I would not put hat creasing in the same category as the other things you mentioned. While shining your shoes and wearing a clean uniform are paramount to looking the part on the field, hat creasing is not. I think creasing is a personal preference (like regular leather vs patent leather) and I personally do not prefer the look.

Dragon29
03-03-2010, 12:17 AM
Wow! A lot of talk over (what I always thought was) a very minor topic.

I disagree that it "looks more professional"; it looks more . . . well . . . creased.

If my association says I should crease my hats, I will. Professional appearance is always a topic of conversation at our (at least) twice yearly clinics and so far I haven't heard word one about it.

I also haven't noticed a preponderance of guys in the association who do, so I'm guessing it's not a big deal in my neck of the woods.

ws32
03-03-2010, 07:45 PM
Amused for days now at how long (and detailed) this thread has gotten. How about an "appearance/impression" thread on something that really matters: maintaining a strong, athletic body type.

Richard_Siegel
03-03-2010, 08:00 PM
Amused for days now at how long (and detailed) this thread has gotten. How about an "appearance/impression" thread on something that really matters: maintaining a strong, athletic body type.

Maintaining it is easy...

Attaining it, unfortunately, is not .....

finnerty
03-05-2010, 06:22 PM
Amused for days now at how long (and detailed) this thread has gotten. How about an "appearance/impression" thread on something that really matters: maintaining a strong, athletic body type.

When I was younger, I was about the fastest running guy in my peer group. Now that I am in my early 50s, I remain the fastest guy in my peer group. My legs are still very strong and my waist is still fairly trim.

But it's a major battle to stay anywhere near my playing weight (195), and it's a major battle to stay somewhat toned, and resist the temptation to relent to all the back joint pain and stop exercising. I look around at not only my buddies, but my umpiring peers (and many younger guys as well), and there are a majority who simply have given in and stopped keeping it up for practical reasons, for pain tolerance reasons, and also for underlying health reasons.

And aside from aesthetics, a heavy umpire is often the best set of eyes, and the most experienced umpiring mind on the field. That's almost always better to have as an umpire than a trim, inexperienced hack. There's a balance to everything.

Looking trim and fit at an advancing age is significantly harder than you seem to understand.

Richard_Siegel
03-05-2010, 06:28 PM
..... a heavy umpire is often the best set of eyes, and the most experienced umpiring mind on the field. ....

I was wondering why I am so good!

finnerty
03-12-2010, 04:51 PM
I was wondering why I am so good! ... ;)

semper_fi_72
03-12-2010, 05:16 PM
a heavy umpire is often the best set of eyes, and the most experienced umpiring mind on the field.

Ok, forget the gym and bring on the Pasta and Beer.
I need to gain some weight so I can be a better umpire. :p

ws32
03-12-2010, 08:17 PM
I just can't agree that maintaining "playing weight" is a "major battle." With nothing more than simple attention to diet and a little exercise most of us should be able to maintain a good, age appropriate look. If joint and back problems are an issue then maybe consideration that its time to hang it up is in order.
I'm 34 years and have had major knee surgery twice and I'm maintaining a weight and waist line that is less than it was in my 20's as I finished playing college football.
BTW: I'm also a football official with aspirations of the next level. When that time comes I'll have to run a sub 8 minute mile simply to get noticed at the selection camp.

heyblue26
03-12-2010, 11:48 PM
Ok you maybe be right here but putting on all those pounds didn't happen over night and we would all probably agree to that fact. But maintaining a standard for your self for health reasons alone should be a motivating factor within itself to keep in shape.

A good apperance is always really nice and it makes you feel better too.

finnerty
03-17-2010, 04:43 PM
I just can't agree that maintaining "playing weight" is a "major battle." With nothing more than simple attention to diet and a little exercise most of us should be able to maintain a good, age appropriate look. If joint and back problems are an issue then maybe consideration that its time to hang it up is in order.
I'm 34 years and have had major knee surgery twice and I'm maintaining a weight and waist line that is less than it was in my 20's as I finished playing college football.
BTW: I'm also a football official with aspirations of the next level. When that time comes I'll have to run a sub 8 minute mile simply to get noticed at the selection camp.
You are 34, and obviously quite ignorant to the dynamics of aging. When you're 50, I hope you remember this exchange. If you can see your shoes by then, it's because you will have battled the metabolic forces to be trim, and not given it "simple attention." And who are you to tell anyone what their limits are? Just because you have a low pain threshold does not mean that everyone does and that they would give into it as soon as you would.

Your words prove that even a man in his mid-30s can appear young and foolish.

nublue
03-18-2010, 03:15 PM
Amen, Finnerty

ump_24
03-18-2010, 03:21 PM
Let the record show the resident youngster around these parts does not endorse the message of ws32.

Somedays I wake up with shoulder pain, both on bad days, from previous separations. And I haven't even hit 20 yet.

We abuse ourselves. To most, it will catch up eventually.

Richard_Siegel
03-18-2010, 03:32 PM
You are 34, and obviously quite ignorant to the dynamics of aging. When you're 50, I hope you remember this exchange. If you can see your shoes by then, it's because you will have battled the metabolic forces to be trim, and not given it "simple attention." And who are you to tell anyone what their limits are? Just because you have a low pain threshold does not mean that everyone does and that they would give into it as soon as you would.

Your words prove that even a man in his mid-30s can appear young and foolish.

ws32..... Be careful when you critize old men. We might smack you upside the head with our cane.

Richard_Siegel
03-18-2010, 03:33 PM
.....We abuse ourselves. To most, it will catch up eventually.

T.M.I. !!

ump_24
03-18-2010, 03:38 PM
T.M.I. !!

Come on now - mind out of the gutter :p

ws32
03-18-2010, 07:45 PM
I'm reminded of the old adage about excuses....

The out of shape/overweight guy is no different to me than the one who won't polish shoes, purchase new hats etc. Officiating demands self discipline. You can't have it both ways.

Richard: leave your cane at home (unless you are bringing it for the song and dance between innings...wait almost forgot that your refusal to entertain is why you didn't once get a choice assignment...LOL)

Anybody that comes at me with a cane would serve themselves best by first removing the handle.

finnerty
03-19-2010, 06:51 AM
You really are a myopic and naive person. Usually such a dearth of wisdom comes from far younger people than you. Wise people are trying to impart to you how life really works outside your narrow, little view, and you not only refuse to absorb the message, you elect to heap more ignorance and arrogance into an already overflowing crock.

bobjenkins
03-19-2010, 01:32 PM
I'm reminded of the old adage about excuses....

The out of shape/overweight guy is no different to me than the one who won't polish shoes, purchase new hats etc. Officiating demands self discipline. You can't have it both ways.

While there's some truth to that, it's also true that when you get older your body changes at an increasing rate. And, you can be in the upper percentiles for "in shape" at, say, 50 and still be heavier, slower, weaker than being "average" at, say, 25.

That said, there are a lot more umpires who are overweight / obese than there seem to be in other sports.

ws32
03-19-2010, 01:49 PM
Bob your post rings 100% true. I do believe that I used the phrase "age appropriate" in one of my earlier posts.

Finn-I am in fact myopic and had my eyes taken care of with lasic a few years ago because eyesight like physical conditioning is simply part of what makes an umpire.

thunderheads
03-19-2010, 02:47 PM
Ws32,

I hope some day we're all as perfect as you are! :roll: I post something every Friday on another site , ....it's called 'douchebag of the week' ...consider yourself nominated

ws32
03-19-2010, 04:16 PM
I've heard of that website!! "Obesity Anonymous"

This week's discussion in the Umpire Forum: Angle over Distance

thunderheads
03-19-2010, 04:22 PM
I've heard of that website!! "Obesity Anonymous"

This week's discussion in the Umpire Forum: Angle over Distance

stop!! stop!! I can't stand it....my sides, my sides....:rolleyes:

finnerty
03-19-2010, 06:22 PM
I've heard of that website!! "Obesity Anonymous"

This week's discussion in the Umpire Forum: Angle over Distance

You do, however, have a healthy level of resiliency to go with your myopia. I'll give you that.

ump_21
03-22-2010, 04:52 PM
These flames have been brought to you by The Newbie Forum.

robbyrudd455
03-24-2010, 05:23 AM
As for the hat creasing - worked with a handfull of D1 college guys and they all instructed me to crease my hat.

Reluctantly, all my hats (even for HS) now have a crease.

Ozzy
03-25-2010, 03:44 PM
These flames have been brought to you by The Newbie Forum.
Yes - the forum where flaming is against the rules!