Category: ABUA
Published on Thursday, 01 December 2011

If you are interested in improving your umpiring skills, then the ABUA is the perfect association for you to join. We want umpires to improve and enhance their skills, wherever they might be working, whether it is at a youth league or a college league. We provide educational programs and resources for umpires, so if this is something you are interested in taking up, why not browse through our site and sign up?

If you have always been interested to continuously learn more about a game so you can improve your skills and knowledge, whether it is reading gaming tips on OnlinePoker.com, or reading up on the latest sports news in a baseball magazine, you might find this article very useful and informative. Here you will learn some interesting baseball facts which you can share with your friends, or other umpires.

Did you know?

That the first five players to be inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum (situated in Cooperstown, New York) were Ty Cobb, Babe Ruth, Honus Wagner, Christy Mathewson and Walter Johnson? Since their entry in 1936, almost 300 people have been entered. These not only include expectational players, but also umpires, pioneers, executives and managers.

The French did what?

It is thought that it was in fact the French who came up with the concept of baseball. A manuscript, dating back to 1344, shows illustrations of clerics who seem to be playing a game very similar to baseball. Other old French games, including théque, la balle au bâton and la balle empoisonée, show clear similarities to baseball.

A whole new meaning to 'stumped'....

The false wooden leg of General Santa Anna was used as a baseball bat by American soldiers in 1847, just a couple of days after the Battle of Cerro Gordo. The leg was seized by the Fourth Illinois regiment and was thought to be the first baseball game ever played in Mexico at Parque Los Berros in Xalapa, Veracruz.

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In The News

Softball teams allowed to use in-game video next season

Softball teams allowed to use in-game video next season

Credit: NCAA Electronic equipment can be viewed between innings Starting next season, softball teams will be able to review video and access information entered into electronic equipment during competition. The NCAA Playing Rules Oversight Panel approved the proposal from the NCAA Softball Rules Committee on Thursday. The new rule allows in-game use of video and statistical technology in the dugouts and other team areas as long as the equipment is not brought onto the playing field during an inning or used to review or challenge an umpire’s decision. Additionally, tournament hosts will be allowed to film and stream all games within their tournament, not just those in which they are participants. “The move to allow more freedom with the use of technology in the dugout is really consistent...
Baseball umpire says player punched him after calling third strike

Baseball umpire says player punched him after calling third strike

Credit: Tigerdroppings.com - Enraged that he was called out on strikes, a 16-year-old baseball player punched an umpire under the left eye, causing serious injuries to the umpire’s face, according to a Jupiter police report. “It’s like he was trying to kill me. He hit me so hard, blood was coming out my nose. I spit and saw a piece of my tooth come out,” said Jupiter resident Chad Saunders, 48, a Marine who was being paid $50 to umpire the July 3 game at an auxiliary field at Roger Dean Stadium. Police have charged the boy, who was not named in the police report, with aggravated battery, a felony. X-rays determined Saunders has suffered four fractures to his cheek below his left eye. His upper left rear molar was chipped. Two plates and several screws were used in an operation on July 16 to...
Batting Myths II

Batting Myths II

Last month we discussed five batting myths, her is one more that has several nuances. Except as noted, the material applies equally to NFHS, NCAA and pro rules. A batter who is standing in the batter’s box cannot be called out for interference. The batter’s box belongs to the batter most of the time, but that doesn’t mean he can always do as he pleases in the box. This myth is most likely to surface when there is a play at the plate. Any unnatural movement by the batter which complicates the catcher's play at home should be construed as interference. If the batter merely stands in the batter's box as the play develops, he is not guilty of interference unless he, in the umpire's judgment, makes some movement to intentionally interfere. On steals of third base, the batter is entitled to his...
Interpretation Changes

Interpretation Changes

As ASA/USA Softball National Championship play is upon us ASA/USA Softball has revised some interpretations on the most significant 2015 rule change. These changes greatly simplify the rule and are designed to make it much more “user friendly” for the teams. I think that umpires will like the changes as well. In pool play games, teams are now permitted to bat more than nine players and can bat up to all players present (often called roster bat). The intent of the rules change was clear and now allows all players present to bat during pool play games if a team wishes to take advantage of this provision. The rule passed also added a clause covering how the shorthanded rule would be handled. The new rules involved read as follows: Rule 4, Section 1D[2A] Exception: In all Junior Olympic...
Lamont tries to Nullify Appeal (7.10)

Lamont tries to Nullify Appeal (7.10)

Playing under Pro rules, when the defensive team makes a pitch or play before making an appeal after continuous action has stopped, they lose the right to make the appeal. It doesn’t sound fair but that’s the rule. Conversely, playing under NCAA or Fed. Rules, the defense can still make the appeal if they make a pitch or play before making the appeal following the cessation of continuous action. Detroit coach Gene Lamont attempted to buy a run for the Tigers by playing Ruleball in the Sept. 15, 2012, game between the Tigers and Indians in Cleveland by inducing the Indians to make a play before making an appeal on a runner who missed a base. The Tigers were batting in the top of the fifth inning with one out and Alex Avila on second base. Avila had just knocked in Brennan Boesch to...
Why Do We Do What We Do?

Why Do We Do What We Do?

As an administrator and educator in umpire programs for many years, I have become known as a person who constantly works on teaching umpires to improve their mechanics. In the last several years I’ve noted that many of my counterparts, even in other sports, likewise emphasize mechanics in all we do. Recently, a group of us were asked to make sure that we were not only teaching mechanics but also were going beyond that to make sure that we were working to insure that officials were trained to get their judgment calls right. This caught me way off guard because, although mechanics have multiple purposes the vast majority of what it taught and what we do is designed to promote good judgment calls. I had heard comments from umpires down through the years that mechanics were overemphasized but...
Time Plays

Time Plays

The “Time Play” rule has caused confusion for players, coaches, managers and umpires at all levels ever since God made little green apples. The rule is universal in all playing codes. Erick Aybar and the Angels’ team were the latest victims of the poorly understood “Time Play” rule. The following play occurred in the June 7 game between the Angels and Yankees in New York. In the top of the third inning the Angels were batting with Aybar on third and Mike Trout on first with one out when David Freese flied to Carlos Beltran in right field. Both Aybar and Trout tagged-up and headed to the next base. Trout was called out at second base before Aybar crossed the plate. If you watch the play carefully, you will notice that Aybar slowed down as he approached the plate and watched the play...
Batting Myths - Part 1

Batting Myths - Part 1

There are some things that umpires will hear until the end of time. Here are some of the fairy tales relating to batting. Except as noted, the material applies equally to NFHS, NCAA and pro rules. Holding the bat in the strike zone is a strike. This falsehood emanates from a softball rule. It can surface on an attempted bunt when the batter holds the bat across the plate as the pitch crosses. If the pitch does not enter the strike zone, the batter must actually strike (“offer at it”) at the ball for a strike to be called. The strike zone has nothing to do with the position of the bat. A batter may actually attempt a bunt by letting the pitched ball strike the static bat; or, he may actually attempt to touch the ball while retracting the bat (thus deadening the bunt). When he does those and...