The ABUA is the largest membership association for amateur baseball umpires in the U.S.

The ABUA's purpose is to improve the overall quality of umpiring in youth league, high school and college baseball through innovative teaching and educational programs, and superior educational resources.The ABUA protects its members with the most comprehensive insurance package in the industry
(Liability, Medical & Lost game fees)!

The ABUA provides a national organization and network where individual umpires and local associations can promote professionalism, integrity and a love of the game.

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In The News

Experimental 20-second pitch-clock rule referred back to committee

Experimental 20-second pitch-clock rule referred back to committee

Credit: NCAA.COM — The NCAA Playing Rules Oversight Panel referred an experimental rule proposal for use of a 20-second pitch clock with runners on base back to the NCAA Baseball Rules Committee on Wednesday. The panel, which met via conference call, wants the Baseball Rules Committee to gather more feedback from conferences to gauge the interest of how many of them would implement the rule during the 2016 season. Panel members are willing to discuss the proposal again at a time to be determined later this fall. If the proposal is ever approved, the Division I Baseball Committee wants to implement the experimental 20-second, pitch-clock rule for all rounds of the 2016 Division I Baseball Championship, including the Men’s College World Series. A base umpire would keep the time on the field;...
Baserunning Myths

Baserunning Myths

In the preceding months, we’ve looked at the myths surrounding that batter. Base runners are not immune to fables that have survived through the years. Except as noted, the material applies equally to NFHS, NCAA and pro rules. The runner must stay in the baseline. The problem with this fable is that there is no baseline, at least not most of the time. What adds to the fallacy is the chalked line between the plate and first and third bases. We all know that is the foul line (part thereof), but some persist in viewing it also as a baseline. The baseline only appears when the runner is being played on. And at that time it is established as a direct line between the runner and the base to which he is advancing or retreating. Such a runner is out if he runs more than three feet away from that...
Using The Time Between Innings

Using The Time Between Innings

A couple of months ago I wrote about the importance of following approved mechanics and how by doing so not only are we able to do a better job of rendering our decisions but also our job can be a little easier. In the case of “between inning mechanics” the primary value is keeping the umpires out of trouble and on occasion there are some things we can do to improve our ability to make the right call. Any discussion of what to do between innings must include being in the right place but it can’t stop there. Furthermore, both the ASA and NFHS manuals make it clear that the defined positions on the field are merely “preferred” and if you need to move to another area you should do so. Until several years ago softball umpires were positioned on the follow lines midway between the plate...
Multiple Rule Plays

Multiple Rule Plays

I’m always intrigued by plays that involve multiple rules. It’s nourishment for my rules cluttered mind. The following 3­6­2­2 triple play, reportedly only the second of its kind in major league baseball history, provides a smorgasbord of rules that will satiate the appetites of event the most robust rules buffs. The Seattle Mariners hosted the Toronto Blue Jays on July 26. Leading, 4­ 3, the Jays had runners on first (Kevin Pillar) and third (Ezequiel Carrera) with nobody out in the top of the fourth inning when Ryan Goins grounded to M’s first baseman Mark Trumbo, who stepped on first for the first out of the inning, then threw to shortstop Brad Miller. At this point Pillar was hung up between first and second. When Carrera ventured too far off third base, Miller’s attention changed...
Softball teams allowed to use in-game video next season

Softball teams allowed to use in-game video next season

Credit: NCAA Electronic equipment can be viewed between innings Starting next season, softball teams will be able to review video and access information entered into electronic equipment during competition. The NCAA Playing Rules Oversight Panel approved the proposal from the NCAA Softball Rules Committee on Thursday. The new rule allows in-game use of video and statistical technology in the dugouts and other team areas as long as the equipment is not brought onto the playing field during an inning or used to review or challenge an umpire’s decision. Additionally, tournament hosts will be allowed to film and stream all games within their tournament, not just those in which they are participants. “The move to allow more freedom with the use of technology in the dugout is really consistent...
Baseball umpire says player punched him after calling third strike

Baseball umpire says player punched him after calling third strike

Credit: Tigerdroppings.com - Enraged that he was called out on strikes, a 16-year-old baseball player punched an umpire under the left eye, causing serious injuries to the umpire’s face, according to a Jupiter police report. “It’s like he was trying to kill me. He hit me so hard, blood was coming out my nose. I spit and saw a piece of my tooth come out,” said Jupiter resident Chad Saunders, 48, a Marine who was being paid $50 to umpire the July 3 game at an auxiliary field at Roger Dean Stadium. Police have charged the boy, who was not named in the police report, with aggravated battery, a felony. X-rays determined Saunders has suffered four fractures to his cheek below his left eye. His upper left rear molar was chipped. Two plates and several screws were used in an operation on July 16 to...
Batting Myths II

Batting Myths II

Last month we discussed five batting myths, her is one more that has several nuances. Except as noted, the material applies equally to NFHS, NCAA and pro rules. A batter who is standing in the batter’s box cannot be called out for interference. The batter’s box belongs to the batter most of the time, but that doesn’t mean he can always do as he pleases in the box. This myth is most likely to surface when there is a play at the plate. Any unnatural movement by the batter which complicates the catcher's play at home should be construed as interference. If the batter merely stands in the batter's box as the play develops, he is not guilty of interference unless he, in the umpire's judgment, makes some movement to intentionally interfere. On steals of third base, the batter is entitled to his...
Interpretation Changes

Interpretation Changes

As ASA/USA Softball National Championship play is upon us ASA/USA Softball has revised some interpretations on the most significant 2015 rule change. These changes greatly simplify the rule and are designed to make it much more “user friendly” for the teams. I think that umpires will like the changes as well. In pool play games, teams are now permitted to bat more than nine players and can bat up to all players present (often called roster bat). The intent of the rules change was clear and now allows all players present to bat during pool play games if a team wishes to take advantage of this provision. The rule passed also added a clause covering how the shorthanded rule would be handled. The new rules involved read as follows: Rule 4, Section 1D[2A] Exception: In all Junior Olympic...